5755 North Point Pkwy, Suite 204, Alpharetta, GA 30022



    Are You At Risk for Hairy Tongue?

    • February 21, 2018

    Best Dentist Near Me You may not realize it, but you could be at risk of developing an unsightly medical condition known as hairy tongue. While it is harmless in most cases, hairy tongue is still an unpleasant ailment. The causes are not always completely known, but practicing good oral hygiene at home and visiting our dental office for cleanings can help prevent the issue. Here’s what you need to know. What is hairy tongue? With hairy tongue, your tongue may look like its covered in fuzz or hair, but this condition is actually caused by an accumulation of bacteria. The surface of your tongue is covered in small, rough papillae which gives it its rough texture. Overtime, these papillae grow, shed, and are replaced. Occasionally, the older papillae may fail to shed properly. This causes a buildup on the tongue and can cause a hair-like appearance. Who is at risk of hairy tongue? According to the American Academy of Oral Medicine, as much as 13% of the population may have hairy tongue. Anyone can develop the condition, but certain risk factors such as age and tobacco use increase your chances. What causes hairy tongue? While the exact causes of hairy tongue are not known, there are a variety of factors that can put you at a higher risk of developing the condition. Poor oral hygiene and a diet of soft foods can put you at an increased risk, as a lack of stimulation on the tongue can prevent the shedding of older papillae. Excessive consumption of certain substances, including tobacco, alcohol, coffee, and tea have been shown to contribute to this condition. Dehydration and dry mouth can slow down the tongue’s natural refresh cycle of replacing papillae. The best defense against hairy tongue is a regular at-home oral hygiene routine that includes twice daily brushing, flossing, and mouthwash. Visiting our practice at least twice a year for cleanings can also give us an opportunity to regularly examine your mouth and catch any early signs of hairy tongue. If you’re past due for your regular cleaning or are concerned that you might be developing hairy tongue, don’t hesitate to contact our practice for an appointment today.

    Change Your Life With a Smile

    • February 14, 2018

    Cosmetic Dentist Near Me The results are in. Multiple studies have confirmed what “Put on A Happy Face” told us to be true; the very act of smiling can have a real impact on your health and happiness. Not only does it make you feel better, but a smiling face can also make you appear more likeable to others, helping you in life, love, and career. Smiling has been shown to reduce your stress level, increase your pain tolerance, boost your immune system, and more. Your smile has a tangible effect on the release of hormones in your brain and can often be enough to turn a bad day around or give you the confidence to get through a difficult task. Maintaining a happy disposition is something that requires work, and smiling can help. There are multiple studies that have confirmed that smiling can help make you happier and more confident, two traits that are greatly desirable in potential friends, partners, and employees. If you feel like your wheels are spinning in life, smiling more could be the trick you need to improve your chances of success. However, if you’re unhappy with the way your smile looks, it can be hard to feel comfortable showing it off. Whether your teeth are yellowed, crooked, or missing altogether, there are plenty of factors that can contribute to a person feeling embarrassed to smile. Our cosmetic dental team is dedicated to helping you gain the smile you’ve always wanted. We’re proud to offer a wide array of cosmetic dental solutions designed around meeting the unique needs of each patient’s smile. When you come for your visit, our dentist will perform a consultation to better understand what about your smile you’d like to change. We’ll then recommend an optimal treatment plan based on your needs, goals, and budget. This will allow you to understand your options and pick the solution that’s right for you! Don’t let embarrassment about your smile continue to hold you back. Contact our dental team today to learn more about how we can help you reclaim happiness and confidence in your life through a smile you’re proud to show off.

    Oral Health and Cancer

    • February 7, 2018

    Dentist Alpharetta There are over 12 million new cases of cancer diagnosed each year. There are a large variety of different kinds of cancer, some of which are more preventable than others. It might seem obvious that brushing and flossing each day as well as avoiding tobacco can help protect you from oral cancer. However, there are types of oral cancer and other cancers that can be prevented through optimal oral care as well. Dental Care and Oral Cancer While it’s long been known that tobacco and heavy alcohol use are the main causes of oral, head, and neck cancer, poor oral health has recently been added to the list. A 2007 study published in American Journal of Epidemiology found that poor mouth health and missing teeth were strongly linked to the development of oral cancer. Likewise, patients with healthy smiles were found to be far less likely to develop oral cancer. If you have been diagnosed with oral cancer, know that common oral health problems such as gum disease and tooth decay could be making the condition worse. Visiting our dental office regularly for professional cleanings, examinations, and oral cancer screenings to help catch signs of oral cancer early and make treatment easier and more effective. Oral Health and Other Cancers Poor oral health has been shown to be tied to other types of cancers outside of the mouth. For example, a recent study conducted by NYU Langone Health’s Perlmutter Cancer Center found that certain types of bacteria in patients with gum disease was tied to a higher risk of developing esophageal cancer. While esophageal cancer only accounts for 1% of new cancer cases diagnosed annually, over 90% of patients will die of the disease. Untreated gum disease opens up the tissues around the teeth to bacterial infection, allowing these harmful bacteria to enter the bloodstream and infect other parts of the patient’s body. Maintaining optimal oral health can help protect you from this threat. Your oral health effects much more than just your mouth. If you’re not taking care of your teeth, tongue, and gums, you could significantly increase your risk of developing cancer without even realizing it. If you’d like to learn more about the connection between oral health and cancer, contact our dental team to schedule an examination and cleaning today!

    Connected Health: Gum Disease and Heart Disease

    • January 25, 2018

    For decades, scientists have been studying the links between periodontal (gum) disease and heart disease. Over the years, research has continued to find strong correlations between these two inflammatory conditions. While there is work yet to be done, we have already discovered connections that may influence how we approach health care in the future. Consider a few key components of the gum disease – heart disease relationship. Gum disease and heart disease share many of the same risk factors. Some of these include smoking, obesity, stress, nutrition, and more. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 70% of Americans aged 65 and older currently have periodontitis – the most advanced form of gum disease. Recent studies have suggested that patients with heart disease may have increased likelihood of developing gum disease as well. Likewise, gum disease increases your risk of heart disease. This may be due to the higher rates of inflammation in your body that occur with gum disease. If you already have a heart condition, gum disease may worsen your illness. One study published in 2015 noted an increase in the severity of heart attacks in patients with gum disease. Heart disease is currently the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. Treating gum disease may decrease your odds of contracting or worsening heart disease. A study published in 2014 found that patients who were treated for gum disease had fewer hospitalizations and lower health care costs related to heart disease. While more research is needed to determine the exact nature of this connection, it is clear that avoiding or treating gum disease can be considered an important part of prevention and treatment for heart disease, as well. You can reduce your risk of serious health complications from heart disease or gum disease. Healthy diet, regular exercise, good dental hygiene, and avoiding tobacco can all help reduce to your risk of developing one or both of these conditions. See your doctor and our dentist regularly for preventive care and treatment. To schedule your periodontal screening, contact our office today.